#PainStopsHere

Clinic Hours : Mon-Thurs 8am-5pm, Fri 8am-12pm   Phone : (254) 245-9175    Fax : (254) 213-7771

IPA News

Holiday Hours

IPA Holiday Closures

Monday, December 23rd                    Christmas

Tuesday, December 24th                     Christmas

Wednesday, December 25th              Christmas

Tuesday, December 31st                     New Years Eve

(half day – 8am-12pm)

Wednesday, January 1st                     New Years Day

 

Extended Fridays

Due to the holiday closures, IPA will be offering extended Friday hours to ensure that we can accommodate all of our patients’ appointments.  Our extended Friday hours are:

Friday, December 6th                           8am-5pm

Friday, December 13th                        8am-2pm

Friday, December 27th                        8am-5pm

Read More

DECEMBER 1-7 is National Handwashing Awareness Week

Washing your hands is one of the best ways to protect you and those around you from getting sick. Clean hands reduce the spread of germs and other bacteria easily found in public spaces like classrooms and libraries. Did you know the CDC has guidelines for washing your hands during this cold & flu season?

When to wash your hands

The CDC recommends everyone wash their hands before engaging in the following activities:

· Before, during, and after preparing food

· Before eating food

· Before and after caring for someone who is sick

· Before and after treating a cut or wound

· After using the toilet

· After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet

· After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

· After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste

· After handling pet food or pet treats

· After touching garbage

How to wash your hands

Handwashing can be broken up into 5 easy steps:

· Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.

· Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.

· Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.

· Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.

· Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Washing hands with soap and water is the best method of eliminating germs, however these conditions aren’t always available. If you don’t have access to soap and water, try using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. While these sanitizers can quickly reduce the amount of germs on your hands, they do not remove all types of germs and might not remove harsh chemicals.

For more information on effective hand washing methods and benefits, visit cdc.gov/handwashing

Read More

Lower Back and Leg Pain Resulting from Irritated or Injured SI Joints

One of the most common causes of low back and pelvic pain occurs with injuries to the sacroiliac (SI) joint and ligaments.

SI Joint Dysfunction Facts & Information

If you are experiencing the seemingly unbearable symptoms of SI joint dysfunction, it’s important to have an accurate diagnosis with thorough tests and evaluations. Often times, sacroiliac (SI) joint dysfunction is difficult to diagnose because the pain patterns are frequently mistaken for nerve irritation in the lower back, muscles sprains, or hip bursitis.

How & Why Does SI Joint Dysfunction Develop?

First, it’s key to understand that the SI joint connects the pelvic bone (ileum) to the lowest part of the spine (sacrum). There are two SI joints. Each is located on either side of the sacrum. SI joints are small and very strong, providing structural support and stability. They function as shock absorbers for the pelvis and the low back, dispersing the forces of the upper body. Whenever an SI joint is irritated or injured, the resultant joint dysfunction may cause pain in the lower back and legs.

SI joints become painful because of alterations in the normal motion of the joints. Consider the following:

Two types of changes from normal motion can cause problems

Those changes are either too much movement (hyper-mobility) or too little movement (hypo-mobility)

Abnormal motion from work/sports can directly injure the joints via stretching/straining the primary SI ligaments

►   Any of these changes in joint mobility may lead to pain, as well as spasm in the supporting back and pelvic muscles

SI joint dysfunction may also result from direct trauma, such as injuries associated with a motor vehicle accident

► Or an injury from something as simple as a fall on the buttocks or a missed step when descending stairs

Symptoms:

► Pain in the lower back
►  Generally aggravated by sitting, standing, or bending at the waist
►  When severe, there will be pain in the hip, groin, and legs

Diagnosis:

Proper diagnosis starts with an experienced pain management doctor. The type of pain that you may have with SI joint dysfunction can be similar to the symptoms of several types of disorders. Accurately determining the correct source of your pain is critical to successful treatment.
► Begins with a thorough clinical evaluation
► Including a complete medical history, analysis of your symptoms, and physical examination
► Testing may include x-rays, MRI and/or CT scans, electro-diagnosis (EMG)
These advanced diagnostic techniques definitively pinpoint the source of pain

Possible Treatments:

Read More

IPA Building New Ambulatory Surgery Center on Ridgemont Drive

A group of physicians specializing in pain management is renovating part of a building on Ridgemont Drive to open a 7,400-square-foot ambulatory surgery center.

Integrated Pain Associates’ outpatient facility at 4351 Ridgemont Drive will have 10 pre-op bays, three surgery rooms and 10 post-op bays. The facility previously was home to Dr. Dan Munton’s Texas Sport and Spine, which IPA bought effective July 1 after Dr. Munton retired.

The Forge Training Facility continues to operate at the north side of the building that originally was home to Circuit City. D1 Sports previously was located in the building.

The surgery center cost is $3 million and is expected to open in July, IPA marketing representative Lydia Bailey said.

Central Texas roots

Dr. Scott Irvine started IPA in Killeen in 2007 with his wife. Since then, the group has grown to nine board-certified pain anesthesiologists serving more than 38,000 patients with practices also in Temple and Waco.

“We do all the most contemporary procedures,” Irvine said. “So, when they come, it’s not just one thing, or one dimensional. It’s multiple dimensions, and I think that is what’s been most exciting for these folks.”

IPA expanded into Abilene in September 2018 with the acquisition of Abilene Spine and Joint operated by Drs. Edward Brandecker and Roberta Kalafut at 1888 Antilley Road.

IPA is moving the Antilley Road surgery center to the new center on Ridgemont Drive, Irvine said.

“In the context of contemporary medicine and meeting all the new criteria associated with surgery centers, it does not pass. It passes now, because it’s grandfathered it, just like so many older things are, but that’s why we’re moving it,” Irvine said.

The new surgery center will be brighter, roomier and more streamlined for the benefit of patients and staff, he said.

Welcomed move

The expansion into Abilene has been positive, Irvine said.

“What we’ve found is the people are just spectacular. The people are just wonderful,” Irvine said about the doctors’ expansion into Abilene.

Two IPA physicians are based in Abilene: Dr. Scott Campbell and Dr. Jerry Tarver.

“One of our requirements on these sorts of things is we don’t want to be viewed as sort of sharks coming to town,” Irvine said. “We hire people and put them in your town. They live there. We have two physicians who actually live and go to church in town. They’re part of the city.”

Irvine and other IPA physicians at Central Texas locations rotate through the practice to assist, Irvine said.

“You have to kind of think about it in terms of you would sort of think about a franchise,” Irvine said. “We’re taking a successful patient management model, we keep everybody educated and contemporary and then we say, ‘OK, let’s open this up and you guys can run this as your place.’ And, that’s what’s happening,” Irvine said.

Interventional procedures are used to address pain at the nerves instead of solely using narcotics, including opioid medications. Such minimally invasive procedures as a dorsal collar stimulator or implanted decompression spinal devices can reduce pain by 50 to 70 percent, Irvine said.

“We can then reduce your narcotic dosing by that amount and then reduce the exposure to the risks associated with opioids,” he said.

What else is in the works (or not yet) for Abilene

Following are updates on other commercial projects in the city, based on city permitting information:

► 3550-3558 S. Clack St. – A site plan for a new retail shell for multiple tenants has been submitted to the city for review, said Tim Littlejohn, building official with the city of Abilene. The lot is just north of Cheddar’s.

► 3650 S. Clack St. – The lot where a Burger King recently was razed after sustaining major storm damage has been cleared. Plans have been filed for a new Burger King building.

► Inca Trio Fire Services  – A new company building is being built at 1009 Martin St.

► ALDI’s – No word from the company on a timeline for plans announced late last year to locate a store next to Kohl’s. The city also does not have permitting applications on file for the company, Littlejohn said.

► Torchy’s Tacos – The Austin-based regional restaurant and bar has listed on its website three job postings for an Abilene location: assistant manager, kitchen manager and managing partner. The company has not submitted permitting requests with the city, Littlejohn said.

► Panera Bread – Although long-rumored that the restaurant is coming to Abilene, no plans are on file with the city for the business, Littlejohn said.

► Tea2Go is opening a second location at 1152 E.N. 10th St. on Oct. 5. 

By , Abilene Reporter-News

Read More

Join us this Pain Awareness Month

Integrated Pain Associates joins the global health care community in recognizing September as Pain Awareness Month.  This international campaign was first established in 2001 to create greater understanding that pain is a serious public health issue. Pain Awareness Month is dedicated to helping people with chronic, acute and cancer pain lead better lives. The movement is supported by health care providers and facilities, research universities and foundations, pharmacists, community and advocacy groups, government agencies, legislators, and the media.

September is Pain Awareness Month

Integrated Pain Associates supports Pain Awareness Month at each of its Texas pain care centers in Killeen, Waco, Temple and Abilene. Some of the goals of this worldwide public awareness campaign include:

·         – Promote awareness of pain as a serious and complex public health issue

·         – Increase awareness of the different types of pain conditions & disorders

·         – Educate patients about available pain treatment & management resources

·         – Provide informational toolkits to nurses and pharmacists

·         – Work with lawmakers to shape responsible pain treatment policies

Learn more about Pain Awareness Month:  https://uspainawarenessmonth.com/

Read More

Texas lawmakers limit opioid prescriptions for acute pain patients

Texas lawmakers last month gave final approval to a bill that will limit opioid prescriptions for acute pain to a 10-day supply, one of several measures passed this session aimed at tackling the state’s opioid overdose crisis.

House Bill 2174 now goes to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk to be signed into law. He has until June 16 to do so or otherwise veto it.

The legislation, authored by Rep. John Zerwas, R-Katy, also requires that all opioid prescriptions be sent to pharmacies electronically to cut down on the number of fraudulent written prescriptions.

Zerwas said the two measures would help address prescription opioid misuse in Texas. He said the less time people are on the medication, the less likely they are to become addicted. The legislation also seeks to reduce the amount of leftover medication, which could be taken by someone else or diverted for illegal use, he said.

Read More

Texas Sport & Spine Acquired by Integrated Pain Associates

Abilene, Texas – Texas Sport & Spine has been acquired by Integrated Pain Associates, a Central Texas based Interventional Pain Management practice that originally opened in Abilene in September 2018.

Dr. Dan Munton, owner of Texas Sport & Spine, announced on Tuesday, June 4th his desire to shift the focus of his practice and has trusted Integrated Pain Associates to assume care for his patients at Texas Sport & Spine starting July 8, 2019. IPA will continue to provide the exceptional pain care that patients have come to expect and will offer a broad range of treatment options, injections and interventional procedures.

Integrated Pain Associates is dedicated to improving its patient’s quality of life by treating the root cause of chronic pain and reestablishing function. IPA has clinics in Killeen, Waco, Temple and Abilene and has cared for Central Texas for over a decade. Since opening in Abilene they have treated nearly 2500 patients and are honored to be serving the Abilene community.

Integrated Pain Associates will be relocating their clinic to the current Texas Sport & Spine location in early July. The new address will be:

Integrated Pain Associates
4351 Ridgemont Dr.
Abilene, TX 79606

Read More

Purdue Pharma to pay $270 million to settle historic Oklahoma opioid lawsuit

(CNN)Purdue Pharma has agreed to pay $270 million to settle a historic lawsuit brought by the Oklahoma attorney general, who accused the OxyContin maker of aggressively marketing the opioid painkiller and fueling a drug epidemic that left thousands dead in the state.

The settlement comes after Purdue fought the attorney general in court, seeking to delay the start of the trial, which is scheduled for May 28.
“It is a new day in Oklahoma, and for the nation, in our battle against addiction and the opioid epidemic,” Attorney General Mike Hunter said Tuesday in Tulsa.
Hunter said that $102.5 million of the settlement would be used to help establish a national addiction treatment and research center at Oklahoma State University, with additional payments of $15 million each year for the next five years beginning in 2020. The company will also provide $20 million of addiction treatment and opioid rescue medications to the center over the same five-year time frame.
A remaining $12.5 million from the settlement will be used directly to help cities and counties with the opioid crisis.

READ FULL STORY HERE

Updated 5:30 PM ET, Tue March 26, 2019

Read More

Obesity Shown to Affect SCS Pain Outcomes

A study from the Cleveland Clinic reported a 20% better pain response to spinal cord stimulation therapy among patients categorized as underweight/normal than morbidly obese.

Investigators used self-reported data from 181 patients treated with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) implants to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and pain relief (Spine J 2019;[3]:476-486). Categorized into four groups, the researchers found a 2% reduction in efficacy for every BMI unit.

The investigators measured pain on an 11-point numerical rating scale before and at six and 12 months after SCS implantation. Using multivariable regression analysis and adjusting for confounding factors such as opioid utilization, they found an inverse relationship between post-SCS outcomes and BMI.

“It could be that being overweight is associated with other degenerative conditions, such as osteoarthritis, that can exacerbate pain in ways that are not amenable to SCS treatment, or that other medical conditions that are more common in people with higher BMI lead to a loss of pain relief over time,” said Joshua M. Rosenow, MD, FAANS, FACS, the director of functional neurosurgery and epilepsy surgery at Northwestern Medicine, in Chicago.

Full Story Read Here: https://www.painmedicinenews.com/Primary-Care/Article/05-19/Obesity-Shown-to-Affect-SCS-Pain-Outcomes/54895

 

Read More

Study Shows Smoking Reduces Efficacy of SCS

San Francisco—Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation have uncovered yet another detrimental effect of smoking. Their retrospective analysis concluded that among pain patients implanted with a spinal cord stimulator, current smokers demonstrated significantly higher pain scores and opioid use than their counterparts who had smoked or never smoked.

“Spinal cord stimulation [SCS] is a great treatment option for patients with chronic spinal pain,” said Youssef Saweris, MD, a pain management fellow at the Cleveland-based institution. “Yet while spinal cord stimulation provides many patients with relief, we occasionally encounter failures.

“One of the common associations with chronic pain is with smoking,” Dr. Saweris continued. “In fact, the prevalence of smoking among adult patients with chronic pain is quite high, and it keeps increasing.”

Full Story, Read Here:  https://www.painmedicinenews.com/Interventional/Article/05-19/Study-Shows-Smoking-Reduces-Efficacy-of-SCS/54896

 

Read More